Editorial

“There was one moment in Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing,” writes Slate’s Dahlia Lithwick, “that revealed why so many are so terrified of him.”  Lithwick deemed this moment so inflammatory that she called it “reprehensible” and “gobsmacking.”  Somewhat more restrained, Politico’s Seung Min Kim and Josh Gerstein said it was “head-scratching.” What was this extraordinary occurrence?  Had Donald Trump’s nominee for attorney general of the United States embraced the notion of a terrorist state like, say, Iran having nukes? Was he in favor of packing the electorate with illegal immigrants and thus changing the electoral landscape forever? Had he admitted to using a private server for thousands of classified documents? Perhaps he voiced his support for abortion-on-demand, thereby adding to the more than 50 million children that have been terminated since Roe v. Wade? Of course, not. Senate Democrats and their media allies see none of these things as “reprehensible” (as they certainly are).  No, the …

Editor’s note: The following column is co-authored venture capitalist Darren Blanton with an introduction by boxing world champion, Floyd Mayweather, to commemorate the founding of the Moblze Foundation. Moblze is dedicated to addressing problems associated with blight in America’s inner cities. Both Mayweather and Blanton will speak at an inaugural kick off event for the Foundation Friday in Washington. The Moblze Foundation’s mission dovetails with the Trump administration’s priority of emphasizing opportunities of entrepreneurship and mentorship in the inner cities. Introduction: My boxing career has afforded me the opportunity to see life’s bigger picture. Twenty years ago, I was a young man from Grand Rapids, Michigan who worked day in and day out to become the best ever at my craft. I could have easily given up when the road became tough, but I never did. I wanted to set an example for my children that with hard work and determination, anything is possible. Today, …

The inauguration is why I love America. Of all the presidential events, from election night to the State of the Union, from press conferences to state dinners, the inauguration is my favorite for one simple reason. More than any other moment, the inauguration is a picture of our Constitution, proof that we are a nation based on representation, not royalty. In a single instance the three branches of government— the executive, judicial and legislative— come together for a united purpose.  A new president takes the oath of office administered by the chief justice of the Supreme Court while standing in front of the U.S. Capitol that houses Congress. This doesn’t mean that everyone is happy about the winner of an election, though many are.  But it does mean that this American experiment, the “sacred fire of liberty” as George Washington called it in his first inaugural, is still burning today. John F. Kennedy, who won …

President Donald Trump’s inauguration Friday was a time of historic transition. It was not just the transfer of power from Washington back to the citizens, as explained by the 45th president. It also marked the transfer of power from the news media to Trump. And journalists weren’t happy about it. Trump did what no politician in the modern era had. He had taken on the most-powerful interest group in America – the media – and won. He celebrated his victory as only Trump could – tweeting from both the @potus account and his own.  He now has more than 35 million followers between the two, about one-and-a-half times the viewers of the three network evening news shows combined. The media acted defeated but not vanquished, calling the inaugural speech “Hitlerian” for daring to use the term “America First.” A viral video of a protester screaming as Trump was announced the new president could well have …

Addressing the nation for the first time as its 45th President, Donald Trump has offered a clear anti-establishment, populist vision. Echoing the central themes of his campaign, Trump has pledged that under his leadership, the power of government will no longer reside in Washington, but truly rest in the hands of the people. Trump’s message emphasized unity and also went to great lengths to invoke a unique spirit of American pride. In his own words, Trump stressed that “whether we are black or brown or white, we all bleed the same red blood of patriots.” This visceral statement seemed to strike the same chord as what Trump described as “carnage” in multiple key facets of American life. For Trump, the American people want great schools, safe neighborhoods, and good jobs, yet, broadly, we are faced with poverty in both urban and rural areas, persistent unemployment in manufacturing industries, which were once the bedrock of the …

The Obama era will come to an end on the morning of Friday, January 20th as Donald J. Trump is inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States of America. Christians in America are divided between those who embrace Trump, those who oppose him, and those who take a “wait-and-see” mentality. Regardless of which category a Christian falls into, here are three things each of us owes President Trump: 1. We owe him the benefit of the doubt. We owe President Trump the benefit of the doubt. For Christians who supported his candidacy, this imperative can be taken for granted. But for others of us who did not support his candidacy, this imperative is a necessary reminder. During the election cycle, we opposed Mr. Trump’s nomination and candidacy for a variety of reasons, including reservations about his ideological framework, policy stances, temperament, and rhetoric. Yet Mr. Trump was victorious, and after his inauguration, our …

As I readied for President Donald Trump’s inaugural address, thoughts of James K. Polk came to mind. Not that America’s 45th and 11th chief executives are peas in a personality pod. Trump has long thrived on an oversized existence; Polk was a grind who didn’t like to socialize (“No president who performs his duties faithfully and conscientiously can have any leisure,” he once remarked). But this much they have in common: Both are unlikely presidents: Polk, the original Democratic “dark horse”; Trump, the victor in a crowded Republican field.   Each gentleman benefitted from mentorship – for Polk, fellow Tennessee Democrat Andrew Jackson; for Trump, the modern celebrity culture. And neither minced words. In March 1845, Polk’s inaugural was one part a lecture on the powers of the Constitution blended with multiple parts of his populist agenda (Texas statehood; dealing with tariffs and banking; continuing America’s inevitable march west). Which brings us to what Trump had …

A classroom conversation about President Donald Trump’s inauguration took a very ugly turn when a California high school teacher drew a caricature of the president as Adolf Hitler. It happened Friday when an English teacher at Verdugo Hills High School drew a Hitler mustache on President Trump’s face. A student in the classroom reportedly posted video of the image on Snapchat. A source with ties to the school sent me a series of photos taken from the video. “The teacher told the students that Trump and Hitler are one in the same,” said the person who sent me the photographs. Click here for a free subscription to Todd’s newsletter: a must-read for Conservatives! The Los Angeles Unified School District would not confirm the identity of the teacher, so I will not name the individual. However, the district did say they are aware of the incident. “While all personnel matters are confidential, the District is aware …

President Trump will travel to CIA headquarters Saturday to meet with the nation’s leading spies and analysts. The visit comes at a strained time between Trump and my former intelligence colleagues, largely because their commander in chief initially rejected – and later acknowledged – their assessment of Russia’s meddling in the 2016 campaign. He did so in very personal, unforgiving terms. But Trump has his own reasons to be frustrated: former intelligence leaders smeared him with unproven allegations of a treasonous relationship with Russia. Even President Obama took a dim view of how they handled the unvetted rumor. So how does Trump reset his relationship with our nation’s spies? One simple idea: show that he can think and act like one. Spies live by a unique set of rules. Some are formal, some are unspoken. All told, they guide how clandestine officers think and behave, shaping their view of themselves, their colleagues, and the world. …

Donald Trump stunned the world with his big win back in November, and he did it by speaking directly to the American people and laying out a very specific agenda to fix the problems we all face. Starting at noon today, President Trump inherits a very big mess, and it will fall upon him to clean it up. I’ve recounted on television, radio and on these pages all the dismal statistics that put President Obama’s failed legacy into sharp relief. I’m not going to go through them all again, but suffice to say that by nearly every measure – the labor force participation rate, welfare rolls, the number of people on food stamps – we are much worse off after enduring eight years of Obama. But it is crucial to remember that there are real people behind the numbers. These are your family members. These are your friends, your colleagues, your neighbors. They are real …

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