ESPN Stats & Info’s guide to the deadline deals

It was a very busy final day of baseball’s trade deadline, and though no superstars were dealt, there were plenty of moves that bolstered postseason contenders. Here’s a look at some of the most notable acquisitions.

Dodgers make big splash, get Reddick and Hill

Not surprisingly, the Dodgers were in go-for-it mode and found a willing partner in the Athletics. They landed a bat in Josh Reddick and an arm in Rich Hill for three prospects.

Since returning to the majors last Sept. 13, Hill hasn’t allowed more than three earned runs in any game, though he’s dealt with a couple of health issues, including most recently a blister. Since his return to the majors, Hill’s 2.06 ERA is second among starters with at least 100 innings pitched.

Reddick is on pace for career highs in batting average (.296) and on-base percentage (.368). He has a .750 OPS since returning from injury on June 28. In 41 games before the injury, he had an .860 OPS.

Reddick gives the Dodgers a big bat against right-handed pitching. His .341 batting average ranks sixth among those with at least 100 at-bats against righties this season.

Mets pick up power with Bruce

Last season, the Mets nearly traded for Reds outfielder Jay Bruce but were unable to reach a deal, netting Yoenis Cespedes instead.

This year, needing another power bat, the Mets were able to secure Bruce in a deal with the Reds.

Bruce leads the National League with 80 RBIs, making him the first player to be traded during a season in which he was leading his league in RBIs, according to research from the Elias Sports Bureau. He has seven home runs and 16 RBIs in his last 10 games.

Since the All-Star Break, the Mets are last in the majors in runs per game (2.9) and 26th in OPS (.651).

Since the start of 2014, Bruce has 0.3 WAR, which makes him essentially a replacement-level player over his last 391 games. He’s hurt by his defense. His minus-13 defensive runs saved rank last among right fielders this season.

Rangers get a DH, a catcher and a reliever

The Rangers made a couple of bold moves in an attempt to put themselves in better position to win a World Series, adding designated hitter Carlos Beltran, catcher Jonathan Lucroy and reliever Jeremy Jeffress.

They moved to fill the void left when Prince Fielder opted for season-ending neck surgery, obtaining Beltran from the Yankees for pitching prospect Dillon Tate. Lucroy and Jeffress both came from the Brewers.

Beltran’s .304 batting average would be his best since 2009, and his .546 slugging percentage would be his best since 2006. He comes to the Rangers off a hot last six weeks, in which he’s slashlining .356/.403/.545. That .356 batting average is second-highest in the American League in that span, trailing Jose Altuve.

Beltran thrives in October. He leads active players with a .441 on-base percentage and .674 slugging percentage in postseason (minimum 75 plate appearances).

Lucroy, who turned down a trade to the Indians last week, ranks second among catchers with an .841 OPS this season. Rangers catchers have a .710 OPS this season, which ranks 13th in the majors. Over the last five seasons, he ranks in the top three among catchers in batting average (.292), on-base percentage (.354), slugging percentage (.459) and WAR (16.9).

Jeffress has converted his last 16 save chances. He has a 1.06 ERA in 17 innings (19 games) since June 10.

Giants add to their rotation and bullpen

The Giants did as they usually do and tried to make an upgrade somewhere –- this time to their starting rotation and their bullpen by getting Matt Moore from the Rays and Will Smith from the Brewers.

The Giants acquired Moore because of a serious divide between their top two starters (Madison Bumgarner and Johnny Cueto) and the rest of their starting rotation. Bumgarner and Cueto have a 2.36 ERA and 1.02 WHIP this season. Their other starters have a 4.90 ERA and 1.33 WHIP.

Moore has pitched well recently. He had a 5.56 ERA in his first 12 starts, but a 2.39 ERA in his last nine.

The Giants paid a price to get Moore in third baseman Matt Duffy. Duffy, currently on the disabled list, finished second in the NL Rookie of the Year voting, hitting .295 with a .428 slugging percentage in 2015. He dropped to .253/.358 in 2016. He’s in the top four in defensive runs saved among third basemen each of the last two seasons.

Giants relievers entered the day with a 3.76 ERA (14th in the majors) and a 20 percent strikeout rate (26th). Smith had a 32 percent strikeout rate in 2014 and 2015, though that’s dipped to 24 percent in 2016.

Also of note:

• The Orioles reacquired Steve Pearce from the Rays for a minor leaguer. Pearce has a .388 on-base percentage and .520 slugging percentage, playing primarily in a pitcher’s park this season. His 147 OPS+ (OPS adjusted for ballpark) ranks 11th in the majors (among those with 200 plate appearances), the same as Miguel Cabrera.

• The Indians traded two minor leaguers to the Rays for outfielder Brandon Guyer, whose primary skill is hitting left-handed pitching. Guyer has a .283/.384/.464 slashline against lefties for his career, with a .344 batting average and 1.082 OPS in 82 plate appearances this season.

• The Blue Jays netted pitchers Scott Feldman from the Astros and Francisco Liriano from the Pirates. Feldman allowed four runs in his last appearance, but before that he had an 11-game stretch of relief outings in which he posted an 0.73 ERA in 24 2/3 innings. Through six starts this season, Liriano had a 3.60 ERA. In 15 starts since, he has a 6.29 ERA. In that 15-start span (since May 13), Liriano’s 6.29 ERA is third-worst among starters.

• The Cubs obtained reliever Joe Smith from the Angels. Smith has held right-handed batters to a .211 batting average since 2009, inducing ground balls 66 percent of the time.

• The Mets also reacquired Jonathon Niese from the Pirates. Niese had a 4.91 ERA in 23 games (18 starts) for the Pirates this season. He had a 3.91 career ERA in eight seasons with the Mets.



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