All-Time #MLBRank, Nos. 60-51

It’s here: The countdown of All-Time #MLBRank moves into the top 100 baseball players across all positions.

To create our list, an ESPN expert panel voted on thousands of head-to-head matchups of 162 players, based on both peak performance and career value.

The top 100 will roll out this week. Here are Nos. 60-51.

So far, we have released Nos. 100-91 | 90-81 | 80-71 | 70-61.

We’ve also rolled out the top 10 players at each position: LHP | RHP | Catchers | Shortstops | Third basemen | Second basemen | First basemen | Left fielders | Center fielders | Right fielders


All-Time #MLBRank: 60-51

Join the discussion by using the #MLBRank hashtag, and follow along @BBTN and on Facebook.


Willie McCovey

Position(s)
First base, left field

Teams
San Francisco Giants (1959-73, ’77-80), San Diego Padres (’74-76), Oakland A’s (’76)

Honors
Rookie of the Year (1959), six-time NL All-Star (’63, ’66, ’68-71), All-Star Game MVP (’69), MVP (’69), Hall of Fame (’86)

Championships
None

Career stats
.270/.374/.515, OPS — .889, Hits — 2,211, HRs – 521, RBIs — 1,555

Did you know?
McCovey was a true slugger in every sense of the word. He hit 521 home runs and averaged a home run every 15.7 at-bats in a 22-year career spanning 1959 to 1980. He also led the National League in slugging percentage three straight seasons from 1968 to 1970. In 1969, McCovey slugged .656 in a year in which the NL average was .359. McCovey had a 1.108 OPS that season, the best of anyone from 1949 to 1992 (Barry Bonds had a 1.136 in 1993). — Mark Simon, ESPN Stats Info

Mel Ott

Position(s)
Right field

Teams
New York Giants (1926-47)

Honors
12-time All-Star (1934-45*), Hall of Fame (’51)

*Game not played in ’45

Championships
1 — New York (1933)

Career stats
.304/.414/.533, OPS — .947, Hits — 2,876, HRs — 511, RBIs — 1,860

Did you know?
As a 20-year-old in 1929, Ott hit 42 home runs, still the most ever in a season by a player that young. Ott would go on to lead the National League in home runs six times, benefiting from the short right-field fence of the Polo Grounds. Of his 511 career home runs, 323 were hit at home, including all 18 in 1943. –Dan Braunstein, ESPN Stats Info

Manny Ramirez

Position(s)
Left field, right field, designated hitter

Teams
Cleveland Indians (1993-2000), Boston Red Sox (’01-08), Los Angeles Dodgers (’08-10), Chicago White Sox (’10), Tampa Bay Rays (’11)

Honors
Nine AL Silver Sluggers (1995, ’99-06), 12-time AL All-Star (’95, ’98-08), World Series MVP (2004)

Championships
2 — Boston (2004, ’07)

Career stats
.312/.411/.585, OPS — .996, Hits — 2,574, HRs — 555, RBIs — 1,831

Did you know?
The all-time leader in postseason home runs with 29, Ramirez never won an MVP despite leading the American League in OPS three times. Ramirez’s 165 RBIs in 1999 are the most by any player since World War II. Though not known for his defense, his 129 career outfield assists are more than Vladimir Guerrero had in his career. — Braunstein

Tony Gwynn

Position(s)
Right field

Teams
San Diego Padres (1982-2001)

Honors
15-time All-Star (1984-87, ’89-99), Hall of Fame (2007)

Championships
None

Career stats
.338/.388/.459, OPS — .847, Hits — 3,141, HRs — 135, RBI — 1,138

Did you know?
Gwynn was an eight-time NL batting champion whose .338 career batting average is the highest in the expansion era. Gwynn batted .300 or higher in 18 straight seasons, the second-longest streak of its kind in baseball history (Ty Cobb, 23). In 1994 he was batting .394 when the season ended abruptly because of a players’ strike. — David Sabino, ESPN Stats Info

Eddie Mathews

Position(s)
Third base

Teams
Boston Braves (1952), Milwaukee Braves (’53-65), Atlanta Braves (’66), Houston Astros (’67), Detroit Tigers (’67-68)

Honors
12-time NL All-Star (1953, ’55-62*), Hall of Fame (’78)

*Played in two All-Star Games in ’59, ’60, and ’61

Championships
2 — Milwaukee (1957), Detroit (’68)

Career stats
.271/.376/.509, OPS — .885, Hits — 2,315, HRs – 512, RBIs — 1,453

Did you know?
Mathews was known for his great power (512 home runs, two-time NL home run champ), but he also had a very strong batting eye. Mathews led the NL in walks four times. He drew 1,444 walks in a career that spanned 1952 to 1968. The only player with more walks in the 1950s and 1960s was Mickey Mantle (1,733). — Simon

Reggie Jackson

Position
Right field

Teams
Kansas City A’s (1967), Oakland A’s (’68-75, ’87), Baltimore Orioles (’76), New York Yankees (’77-81), California Angels (’82-86)

Honors
14-time All-Star (’69, ’71-75, ’77-84), two-time World Series MVP (1973, ’77), MVP (’73), two Silver Sluggers (’80, ’82), Hall of Fame (’93)

Championships
5 — Oakland (1972-74*), New York (’77-78)

*Did not play in 1972 World Series

Career stats
.262/.356/.490, OPS — .846, Hits — 2,584, HRs — 563, RBIs — 1,702, Ks — 2,597 (all-time leader)

Did you know?
Known as “Mr. October” for his postseason success, Jackson won five World Series titles, most famously hitting three home runs in Game 6 of the 1977 World Series. In 27 World Series games, Jackson hit .357 with a .457 on-base percentage, .755 slugging percentage, along with 10 home runs and 24 RBIs. His 1.222 World Series OPS ranks fourth all time behind David Ortiz, Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig. — Simon

Jim Palmer

Position(s)
Right-handed starter

Teams
Baltimore Orioles (1965-67, ’69-84)

Honors
Six-time All Star (’70-72, ’75, ’77-78), three Cy Youngs (1973, ’75-76), four Gold Gloves (’76-79), Hall of Fame (’90)

Championships
3 — Baltimore (1966, ’70, ’83)

Career stats
W-L: 268-152, 53 shutouts, 3,948.0 innings pitched, 2.86 ERA, 2,212 strikeouts, 1.180 WHIP

Did you know?
Palmer was an eight-time 20-game winner for the Orioles. All of his 20-win seasons came in the 1970s. He’s one of four pitchers to have at least eight 20-win seasons within a decade in baseball’s modern era. The other three are Christy Mathewson (1900s), Walter Johnson (1910s) and Warren Spahn (1950s). — Simon

Carl Yastrzemski

Position(s)
Left field, first base

Teams
Boston Red Sox (1961-83)

Honors
18-time All-Star (’63, ’65-79, ’82-83), All-Star Game MVP (’70), MVP (1967), Triple Crown (’67), seven Gold Gloves (’63, ’65, ’67-69, ’71, ’77), Hall of Fame (’89)

Championships
None

Career stats
.285/.379/.462, OPS — .841, Hits — 3,419, HRs — 452, RBIs — 1,844

Did you know?
Yastrzemski ranks in the top 40 all time in both home runs and wins above replacement, and in the top 15 all time in RBIs. Yastrzemski is best remembered for his Triple Crown-winning 1967 season. His 12.4 wins above replacement that season are the most in a season by a position player not named Babe Ruth. — Simon

Hank Greenberg

Position
First base

Teams
Detroit Tigers (1930, ’33-41, ’45-46), Pittsburgh Pirates (’47)

Honors
Two-time AL MVP (1935, ’40), five-time AL All Star (’37-40, ’45*), Hall of Fame (’56)

*Game not played

Championships
2 — Detroit (1935, ’45)

Career stats
.313/.412/.605, OPS — 1.017, Hits — 1,628, HRs — 331, RBIs — 1,274

Did you know?
Greenberg is one of five players in major league history to have at least three seasons of 150 or more RBIs. The other four are Lou Gehrig, Babe Ruth, Jimmie Foxx and Al Simmons. Greenberg holds the top four spots on the Tigers’ single-season RBI list and has five seasons that rank in the top eight. He had five seasons with at least 130 RBIs. By comparison, Miguel Cabrera has two with Detroit. — Simon

Derek Jeter

Position(s)
Shortstop

Teams
New York Yankees 1995-2014

Honors
Rookie of the Year (1996), 14-time All Star (’98-2002, ’04, ’06-12, ’14), All-Star MVP (2000), World Series MVP (’00), five Gold Gloves (’04-06, ’09-10), five Silver Sluggers (’06-09, ’12)

Championships
5 — New York (1996, ’98-2000, ’09)

Career stats
.310/.377/.440, OPS — .817, Hits – 3,465, HRs — 260, RBIs — 1,311

Did you know?
Jeter’s 3,465 career hits are the most in Yankees history. His eight 200-hit seasons are tied for fourth-most all time. Technically speaking, Jeter actually had another 200-hit season: His 200 postseason hits (in 158 games) are the most all time. — Simon


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