NCAA Takes A Stand Against North Carolina Discriminatory Bathroom Law But Is It Meaningless?


The NCAA is the latest major organization to condemn North Carolina’s Public Facilities Privacy Security Act. The bill states that people must use the restrooms assigned to the sex they were born with rather than the one they identify with. It’s faced extreme criticism as being discriminatory against transgender people. 

According to a press release, the NCAA decided that “sites hosting or bidding on NCAA events in all divisions — from the Men’s and Women’s Final Fours to educational events such as leadership development conferences” demonstrate that they will provide discrimination-free environments for athletes, spectators and other people involved. 

“The higher education community is a diverse mix of people from different racial, ethnic, religious and sexual orientation backgrounds,” said Kirk Schulz, president of Kansas State University and chair of the Board of Governors. “So it is important that we assure that community – including our student-athletes and fans – will always enjoy the experience of competing and watching at NCAA championships without concerns of discrimination.”

The NCAA is surprisingly on top of social issues

For example, states that still fly the Confederate flag are prohibited from hosting any NCAA-sanctioned event outside of regular season competition. Additionally, schools that use a Native American nickname or mascot are prohibited from hosting these events. That includes March Madness, which is famous for being a big money maker. It has caused some schools to change their ways. 

Some people don’t think the NCAA’s promise means anything

“It’s a toothless policy and it’s not going to have any immediate effect,” Cyd Zeigler, co-founder of, told MSNBC. “We have been asking the NCAA to do two things: move its events out of places trying pass these bills, and bar all institutions that discriminate against LGBT people from being members of the NCAA… This is a bait-and-switch.”

comments powered by Disqus